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Credit Blossom (Spread) (work of art)

Información sobre la obra de arte

Creado
1978
Nacionalidad
Americana
Nacimiento/Muerte
1925-2008
Dimensiones
84 x 108 x 2 inches (213.4 x 274.3 x 5.1 cm)

Crédito

Purchased with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina State Art Society (Robert F. Phifer Bequest), and the State of North Carolina
©Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Cultura
Americana Carolina del Norte

Acerca de

A formidably gifted renegade, Robert Rauschenberg uses materials in imaginatively nontraditional ways. In 1955 he made a painting out of his own bed (titled Bed, it is in the Museum of Modern Art in New York), and nearly twenty-five years later, he constructed-rather than painted-Credit Blossom (Spread) out of a worn quilt and fabrics, printed with images appropriated from the media.

In addition to the decorative pleasures of its primary colors and patterned surface, Credit Blossom bears witness to contemporary life. The multiple clock faces (which the repeating patterns in the quilt somewhat resemble) insist that time rules. The artist also pairs contrasts: the natural and the technological, the homespun and the factory-fabricated, the supposedly simpler past and the undeniably complicated present.

tags: textile, change, order, part/whole, subjectivity, pattern, North Carolina

Imágenes

  • Credit Blossom (Spread) Pintura de Robert Rauschenberg

    Credit Blossom (Spread)

    A formidably gifted renegade, Robert Rauschenberg uses materials in imaginatively nontraditional ways. In 1955 he made a painting out of his own bed (titled Bed, it is in the Museum of Modern Art in New York), and nearly twenty-five years later, he constructed-rather than painted-Credit Blossom (Spread) out of a worn quilt and fabrics, printed with images appropriated from the media. In addition to the decorative pleasures of its primary colors and patterned surface, Credit Blossom bears witness to contemporary life. The multiple clock faces (which the repeating patterns in the quilt somewhat resemble) insist that time rules. The artist also pairs contrasts: the natural and the technological, the homespun and the factory-fabricated, the supposedly simpler past and the undeniably complicated present.